How you feel about your body impacts many aspects of your life; your confidence, self-esteem, boundaries you have with other people, your mental and physical health. Your relationship with your body is the most important relationship in your life. Why?

Setting healthy boundaries with other people in your life is an important part of establishing your identity and is a crucial aspect of mental health and self-care. Weak boundaries lead to anxiety, higher stress levels, feelings of being taken advantage of, disrespected, not acknowledged and are often linked to unhealthy relationships.

Hypnosis works with the “subconscious” part of the mind. So to understand hypnosis, you have to understand how the mind works. So, is there that kind of power in a soothing voice and a swinging watch? Well, it turns out that hypnosis is not just a party trick.

Cancer is related to a significant deterioration in the mental health of patients. Currently, hypnosis is investigated for its ability to assist with various side effects of this disease, such as depression, chronic fatigue, anxiety, and chronic pain.

The majority of us have linked hypnosis with an image: a man or woman brings out a chained clock, swings it like a pendulum saying something like, "At my count of three, you will do so and so… 1…2…3…!”

In the United Kingdom, the contribution of hypnotherapy has been in past, and it is very useful. There are many hypnotherapy organizations. Each of them has an ethical and practical code to maintain high professional standards.

Perhaps no one would expect that multiculturalism is something that can be linked to hypnotherapy, but to be able to understand what is hidden in the meaning we need to ask how hypnotherapy can be beneficial in searching for bridges between cultures.

Stigma is the use of stereotypes and labels when describing someone, and it is often attached to people who suffer from mental health issues. We don't fully understand how the brain works yet, but one thing we DO know is that it is an organ. Yet our society doesn't readily accept brain disorders the way we accept other organ disorders. Why is this so?

Surely at least once in your life, you’ve had anxiety. An unmanageable feeling of being immersed, knowing that there is no other choice. Is it really true that you don’t have any other choice? There are always choices, but uncomfortable feelings do not allow us the opportunity to see them.